StoryCorps Griot Coming to Montgomery

StoryCorps Griot is a national oral history initiative designed to collect the stories of African Americans.

The Birmingham African-American Genealogy Study Group, a special interest group of the Birmingham Genealogical Society, will be participating in StoryCorps Griot in Montgomery on February 15th.

Six slots for interviews on Friday, February 15th 2008 in Montgomery have been allocated to BAAGSG. The interviews will be 45 minutes and two people at a time.

Most of you have wonderful stories about your family. You will be given a copy of your interview via CD before you leave, and copies will be given to the National Museum of African American History and Culture and to the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. Selected stories are broadcast on NPR. Think of a person you would like to be in the interview with because you will be interview each other.

If you would like to participate, please contact Josephine Govan at (205) 510-2670 or (205) 631-9818 as soon as possible.

Slave Insurance – who knew?

While reading one of my favorite newsletters this morning, I discovered something that I didn’t know had existed … although it makes sense that it would have if you think about it. I am talking about Slave Insurance. Pre-1865, the end to slavery in America, insurance companies selling in the South offered insurance not only to a plantation owner’s physical property, but his human property as well. Read more about this practice here.

Certain states have passed laws requiring insurance companies to disclose the information contained in those policies such as the name of the slave, county, other identifying information, name of slaveholder, the county of slaveholder, and to whom the policy was issued.

Information for California and Illinois is online. You are probably thinking like I did. .. but slavery wasn’t legal in those states? The law requires them to give information on polices from companies that have since acquired as well – so you will find coverage for many states including Alabama.

Links to the lists:

California List

Illinois List

Shadow Lawn Cemetery being Restored

The Shadow Lawn Memorial Gardens Maintenance and Perpetual Care Association has taken over the care of one of Birmingham’s oldest remaining black cemeteries. Shadow Lawn has fallen into disrepair and been the subject of numerous negligence lawsuits in recent years. Read more about the work of the association the the need for funds to continue to help restore the badly neglected cemetery in a Birmingham News article here.

EARLY AFRICAN AMERICAN PHYSICIANS IN THE ALABAMA BLACK BELT

Passing along this information on an upcoming program of the Black Belt African American Genealogical and Historical Society.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

A.J. WRIGHT TO SPEAK ON EARLY AFRICAN AMERICAN PHYSICIANS IN THE ALABAMA BLACK BELT

Records of Black physicians in Alabama date to shortly after the Civil War

SELMA, AL — October 16, 2007 — A.J. Wright, M.L.S., Associate Professor and Director, Section on the History of Anesthesia, Department of Anesthesiology Library, University of Alabama at Birmingham, will deliver a talk on “Early African American Physicians in the Alabama Black Belt” on Saturday, October 20, 2007, in the Vaughan-Smitherman Room, Selma-Dallas County Public Library, 1103 Selma Avenue, Selma AL, at 12:00 PM. The event is sponsored by the Black Belt African American Genealogical and Historical Society. It is free and open to the public.

A.J. Wright has been researching the history of anesthesia in the United States for more than twenty years and in Alabama for the past decade. In the process of doing his research he began to come across records of Black physicians who were practicing in Alabama shortly after the Civil War and who began to receive certification in Alabama beginning in the late 19th century.

Among the prominent Black Belt physicians researched by Mr. Wright are: Lincoln Laconia Burwell who graduated valedictorian from both Selma University in 1886 and from Leonard Medical School of Shaw University in 1890 and owned a drug store on Franklin Street and set up Burwell Infirmary on Philpot Avenue in Selma; John Wesley Moorer who was born in Braggs and graduated from Selma University and Meharry Medical College in Nashville, TN., and did post-graduate work at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore; Cornelius Nathaniel Dorsett who was born a slave in 1852 and became Alabama’s first licensed Black physician and founded Hale Infirmary in Montgomery, Alabama’s first hospital for Blacks; and, Halle Tanner Dillon, who in 1891 became the first African-American woman and first female to sit for the Alabama medical licensure examination.

A.J. Wright is a frequent speaker and author of articles related to medical history in Alabama and elsewhere. He is also the moderator of the “alabamahistory” discussion list at Yahoo! Groups.

For more information about the event, contact B.J. Smothers, 334-877-4846 / 404-273-6965, bjsmothers@bellsouth.net. To reserve a salad or sandwich box lunch ($8.00 each) for the event, contact B.J. Smothers or Rev. Dr. Jabrina Howard, 334-872-8984 or revdrjabri@msn.com by Friday, October 19.

About BBAAGHS:
BBAAGHS’ mission is to discover, collect, organize and preserve the genealogy and history of African Americans in Alabama ’s Black Belt Region. The group meets on the 3rd Saturday of the month at the Selma-Dallas County Public Library, 1103 Selma Ave., Selma, AL. For more information, visit the website: www.bbaaghs.org.

Reminder – BAAGSG Meeting October 14, 2007

 

 

The Birmingham African American Genealogy Study Group (BAAGSG), a special interest group of the Birmingham Genealogical Society, meets the second Sunday of each month (ex. May and November) in the Arrington Auditorium at the Downtown Birmingham Public Library. Guests are welcome!

Next meeting: Sunday, October 14th, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Program Topic: Group Project – Each member will give a presentation as to the most unique finding during their research (minimum of five minutes/maximum of ten minutes)

Details: www.birminghamgenealogy.org or BPL-Southern History Dept. at (205) 226-3665.

Contact Officers:

Josephine Martin (Founder) – (205) 901-6387
Barbara King (President) – (205) 424-5461

Please join us for this informative discussion!

Reminder – BAAGSG Meeting September 9, 2007

The Birmingham African American Genealogy Study Group (BAAGSG), a special interest group of the Birmingham Genealogical Society, meets the second Sunday of each month (ex. May and November) in the Arrington Auditorium at the Downtown Birmingham Public Library. Guests are welcome!

Next meeting: Sunday, September 9th, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Program Topic: Researching Family History That Covers Multiple Neighboring Counties (Including Counties that No Longer Exists)

Details: www.birminghamgenealogy.org or BPL-Southern History Dept. at (205) 226-3665.

Contact Officers:

Josephine Martin (Founder) – (205) 901-6387
Barbara King (President) – (205) 424-5461

Please join us for this informative discussion!

BAAGSG Meeting August 12, 2007

The Birmingham African American Genealogy Study Group (BAAGSG), a special interest group of the Birmingham Genealogical Society, meets the second Sunday of each month (ex. May and November) in the Arrington Auditorium at the Downtown Birmingham Public Library. Guests are welcome!

Next meeting: Sunday, August 12th, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Program Topic: How to Rekindle a Stalled Research Project

Details: www.birminghamgenealogy.org or BPL-Southern History Dept. at (205) 226-3665.

Contact Officers:

Josephine Martin (Founder) – (205) 901-6387
Barbara King (President) – (205) 424-5461

Please join us for this informative discussion!

BAAGSG Meeting July 15, 2007

 

The Birmingham African American Genealogy Study Group (BAAGSG), a special interest group of the Birmingham Genealogical Society, meets the second Sunday of each month (ex. May and November) in the Arrington Auditorium at the Downtown Birmingham Public Library. Guests are welcome!

Next meeting: Sunday, July 15th, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Program Topic: Language of The Alabama Rural South and How It May Impact Your Research

Details: www.birminghamgenealogy.org or BPL-Southern History Dept. at (205) 226-3665.

Contact Officers:

Josephine Martin (Founder) – (205) 901-6387
Barbara King (President) – (205) 424-5461

Please join us for this informative discussion!

Tombstone’s home has been found

I spoke with Randy Mooremann with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s office. He has been in contact with the Morgan County Sheriff’s office and they have located a great-grandchild of Mr. Taylor’s. They are presently working out the details to get the tombstone back home.

According to Mr. Mooremann the tombstone was originally stolen along with another back in the early 1970’s. The other tombstone was recovered soon after, but this one had never been located … until now.

This is great news! Another tombstone returned to its proper resting place.